Using the Gelli Plate

I recently applied to be on the ColourArte design team and am excited to announce I was invited to audition.

I’d hoped to make this as a video, but unfortunately I am not familiar with the editing software, and didn’t have enough time to learn before this post needed to be up. My aim is to be making videos in the very near future. (Read as: I’m on it!)

Since my audition requires that I use paints (which I love), I decided the audition would be all about the Gelli Plate.

I started by adding a some blue and yellow acrylic paint on the Gelli Plate, then spread with a brayer. Use a light touch, otherwise you’ll end up with streaks across the paint. *Don’t be overly generous with the paint, otherwise you’ll end up with thick blobs. If that happens, remove some of it by brayering over it, then brayer onto some scrap paper, or in a journal for later use.

I bought a cake decorating rolling pin a while back – for $2 – and have used it on the gelli plate before, with great results. So I used it again this time around.  Because the paint is slippery, you need to roll slowly, otherwise you will just end up with a load of smudges.

As you can see, the daisies are quite open, so I decided to use black cardstock for this pull. You can use any colour cardstock – whatever colour you’d like in the background (behind your flowers or other open design).

Here’s a close up:

Just because you need to do something with your Gelli Plate pulls, here is a card I made with the above.

(Greeting from Stampin’ Up! and die is from Spellbinders.)

And because you can never stop at just one, I made several backgrounds. This photo shows how little paint you need to use. (You can always add more later if needed.)

Above: Gold, Pearl White and Blue added to the Gelli Plate

Above: After brayering you can see the gold running through it.

Above: I laid this sheet over the gelli plate and brayered over the top of it. (This is what is left after sequins are punched out.) I did it all the way down the gelli plate as shown below.

I had a lot of fun making these creations, and will make the remainder into cards or use in my journal.

Here’s what my craft table looked like after I’d finished playing. Lots of backgrounds, ready for future use.

Thanks for looking, and as always, if you want to comment and the comment box isn’t showing, click the title of this post and it will magically appear!

cheryl

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8 thoughts on “Using the Gelli Plate

  1. Thanks Verna. It’s a lot of fun, but can be a little messy. I don’t necessarily see that as a negative. 🙂

  2. I know how much fun it is to use a gelli plate after you brought yours to Queensland for the Craft Show and came home with me for the week. Thanks so much for sharing this fascinating technique with me. You have shown the procedure perfectly here Cheryl and i LOVE the results you achieved. That rolling pin makes the most amazing pull. Love the colours you chose . I wish you the best of luck in being chosen as a Designer for ColoutArte. You certainly have the talent in all things mixed media and anything requiring paints. I can vouch here as you have made me the most incredible mixed media canvas last year – inspiring me to try something new which now I love.
    Ina recently posted..Live with Passion!My Profile

  3. Thanks so much, Ina. It was amazing watching you learn how to use the Gelli Plate when I stayed with you.

    It is such a fun thing to do, and I could literally do it for hours.

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